Subscribe
The Social Media Marketing Doctor is in.

Being eMarkable

Since you are among the select few actively seeking to better understand marketing and propagate this scientific art-form that percolates our lives in a plethora of ways, you may think you understand what being eMarkable is all about. However, as most things in life are, it is complicated.

First, the simple part, eMarkable is as easy to define as remarkable. Remarkable is an adjective (a part of speech that modifies a noun) that states that said noun is worthy of making a remark about (e.g. “Becoming president of the United States is a remarkable achievement”). Similarly, eMarkable implies that said noun is worthy of a social media remark (e.g. “Reaching 100,000 likes on facebook is an eMarkable achievenement”).

Next time your friend shares a photograph of a cat that “can has cheezburger,” ask them if said photograph is really worthy of their eMark (no, it isn’t). However, this is where being eMarkable gets complicated—eMarkableness is in the eye of the beholder. Just because something is eMarkable to you, doesn’t mean it is eMarkable to me or vice versa. As an eMarketer, being eMarkable means that people are going to make an eMark about the product, website, ideology, or whatever you are eMarketing. If people don’t make an eMark, you are eOrdinary.

That’s it, now you have a firm grasp on being eMarkable…maybe. Being eNoticed is not the same as being eMarkable. If you post a nude picture of yourself on Facebook, you will be eNoticed (probably by Facebook administration); however, it won’t accomplish much more than that. It will be removed from the internet and you may be banned from Facebook—not much beyond that will transpire. Although stunts might help you become eMarkable, it isn’t the end of the line.

In the case of being eMarkable, the end of the line can be found by continually stepping over the line. As British author Stephen Hunt wrote, “If you’re not living on the edge, you’re taking up too much space.” He wasn’t talking about getting a bigger slice of the pie as an eMarketer. Being eMarkable requires an eMarketer to live and proliferate on the outskirts. eMarkableness is fleeting—just because the masses, or select few, are sharing your message across the interwebs one day, doesn’t mean they will continue to do so tomorrow. Some people won’t like you for it, but as long as a few are spreading your message, reinvest and push the envelope a bit further.

Now that you grasp the concept of being eMarkable, the real challenge comes from continually being eMarkable. To find out how to do that, check out the rest of this eMarkable website.

Bookmark and Share

Latest Blog Posts

Latest Vlog Posts

Twitter Feed